Daily Archives: 03/17/2019


Coenzyme Q10 and Degenerative Disorders Affecting Longevity: An Overview 3

Coenzyme Q10 and Degenerative Disorders Affecting Longevity: An Overview

Abstract: Longevity is determined by a number of factors, including genetic, environmental and lifestyle factors. A major factor affecting longevity is the development of degenerative disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, kidney disease and liver disease, particularly where these occur as co-morbidities. In this article, we review the potential role of supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) for the prevention or management of these disorders. Thus, randomised controlled clinical trials have shown supplementation with CoQ10 or CoQ10 plus selenium reduces mortality by approximately 50% in patients with cardiovascular disease, or in the normal elderly population, respectively. Similarly, CoQ10 supplementation improves glycaemic control and vascular dysfunction in type II diabetes, improves renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease, and reduces liver inflammation in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The beneficial role of supplemental CoQ10 in the above disorders is considered to result from a combination of its roles in cellular energy generation, as an antioxidant and as an anti-inflammatory agent.

Keywords: coenzyme Q10; oxidative stress; inflammation; diabetes; cardiovascular disease; chronic kidney disease and liver disease; mitochondria

Full Study


Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Aging and Disease

Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Aging and Disease

Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and an antioxidant in plasma membranes and lipoproteins. It is endogenously produced in all cells by a highly regulated pathway that involves a mitochondrial multiprotein complex. Defects in either the structural and/or regulatory components of CoQ complex or in non-CoQ biosynthetic mitochondrial proteins can result in a decrease in CoQ concentration and/or an increase in oxidative stress. Besides CoQ10 deficiency syndrome and aging, there are chronic diseases in which lower levels of CoQ10 are detected in tissues and organs providing the hypothesis that CoQ10 supplementation could alleviate aging symptoms and/or retard the onset of these diseases. Here, we review the current knowledge of CoQ10 biosynthesis and primary CoQ10 deficiency syndrome, and have collected published results from clinical trials based on CoQ10 supplementation. There is evidence that supplementation positively affects mitochondrial deficiency syndrome and the symptoms of aging based mainly on improvements in bioenergetics. Cardiovascular disease and inflammation are alleviated by the antioxidant effect of CoQ10. There is a need for further studies and clinical trials involving a greater number of participants undergoing longer treatments in order to assess the benefits of CoQ10 treatment in metabolic syndrome and diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, and human fertility.

Full Study


Bioavailability of coenzyme Q10 supplements depends on carrier lipids and solubilization 2

Bioavailability of coenzyme Q10 supplements depends on carrier lipids and solubilization

Objectives: Bioavailability of supplements with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in humans seems to depend on the excipients of formulations and on physiological characteristics of the individuals. The aim of this study was to determine which factors presented in CoQ10 supplements affect the different response to CoQ10 in humans.

Methods: We tested seven different supplement formulations containing 100 mg of CoQ10 in 14 young, healthy individuals. Bioavailability was measured as area under the curve of plasma CoQ10 levels over 48 h after ingestion of a single dose. Measurements were repeated in the same group of 14 volunteers in a dou- ble-blind crossover design with a minimum of 4 wk washout between intakes.

Results: Bioavailability of the formulations showed large differences that were statistically significant. The two best absorbable formulations were soft-gel capsules containing ubiquinone (oxidized CoQ10) or ubiqui- nol (reduced CoQ10). The matrix used to dissolve CoQ10 and the proportion and addition of preservatives such as vitamin C affected the bioavailability of CoQ10. Although control measurements documented that all formulations contained 100 mg of either CoQ10 or ubiquinol, some of the participants showed high and others lower capacity to reach high increase of CoQ10 in blood, indicating the participation of individual unknown physiological factors.

Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of individually adapted selection of best formulations to reach the highest bioavailability of CoQ10 in humans.

Full Study